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Control Arms - Upper Control Arms
On most stock cars the top A-Plate is set back to build in the positive caster that most people run. Using slotted A-Arms and slugs makes for quick and consistent adjustments at the track or in the shop.

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Control Arms - Upper Control Arms - AFCO Upper Control Arms
AFCOs foundation was built on fabricating tubular control arms for the racing industry. Because we pay attention to the details and adhere to the strictest manufacturing tolerances, AFCO control...More Details »
Control Arms - Upper Control Arms - Allstar Performance Upper Control Arms
Allstar Performance Upper Control Arms are IMCA legal and fit stock, 6-7/8" mounts, found on Mid-size GM metric frames. Use with bolt-in style ball joint, Allstar 56220 or Moog K5208. Steel...More Details »
Control Arms - Upper Control Arms - Howe Precision Max Upper Control Arms
Howe Precision Max a-frames offer the same low drag and low friction as other Howe precision products. The sealed dual row ball bearing design allows bind free movement under severe braking...More Details »
Control Arms - Upper Control Arms - JOES Slotted Bearing Upper Control Arms
Four sealed roller bearings distribute the load for an A-Arm that rotates freely under load. a machined housing retains 2 bearings on each side eliminating weld distortions that can create binding....More Details »
Control Arms - Upper Control Arms - JOES Upper Control Arms
Precision machine work and quality materials put JOES A-ARMS in a class of their own.
Control Arms - Upper Control Arms - UB Machine 15 Series "WSP" Upper Control Arms
15 series "WSP" upper control arms include wide split twin plates, which separate to allow mounting around chassis. Control arms accept bolt-in style ball joints and are offered with choice of steel or aluminum inner shafts.
Control Arms - Upper Control Arms - UB Machine 15 Series Upper Control Arms
Standard Upper Control Arms with aluminum inner shafts with 6" hole spacing. Bolt-in style accepts #ALL56204 Allstar Ball Joint (sold separately).
Control Arms - Upper Control Arms - UB Machine 19 Series Upper Control Arms
Standard Upper Control Arms with steel inner shaft with 6" hole spacing. Threaded style accepts #ALL56214 Allstar Ball Joint (sold separately).
Control Arms - Upper Control Arms - UB Machine Camaro Upper Control Arms
Camaro Upper Control Arms have steel inner shafts and 7-3/4" hole spacing. Bolt-In Ball Joint style (use Allstar #ALL56204 ball joint).
Control Arms - Upper Control Arms - UB Machine GM Metric Upper Control Arms
Offset control arms for stock GM '78-88 metric chassis have inner shafts with 6-7/8" spacing.
Control Arms - Upper Control Arms - UB Machine Offset Upper Control Arms
Tubular control arms feature 6-1/2" long inner shafts, typical to Dirt Works and other chassis using '64-72 GM "A"-Body (Chevelle) frame.


More About Upper Control Arms

On most stock cars the top A-Plate is set back to build in the positive caster that most people run. Using slotted A-Arms and slugs makes for quick and consistent adjustments at the track or in the shop.

For experienced drivers, that have a good feel, I might reduce the caster split. The chassis premise is that you know your good driver and you can allow him or her to drive the car without interference from overdone geometry. Again, there is much to consider and other chassis goals would easily override this choice. The experienced driver feels the car and sometimes wants the control in their hands as they anticipate with confidence. In this case, they want to turn the wheel for the desired effect verses being forced into a geometry change that happens outside of their steering input control.

I would push the window on caster amounts and splits on tracks that are smooth and with sweeping corners. If the driver can consistently turn in and unwind the wheel smoothly then adding caster and split can help find speed due to the geometric benefits discussed.

All that said caster and caster split is very much car, track and driver specific. In much of the country our short tracks are worn out, bumpy and the corner transitions can be abrupt. For rough tracks where drivers are constantly sawing on the wheel, too much caster and caster split can cause the car to be erratic. All the directional change from a steering wheel that is being turned back and forth quickly will upset the car. You can imagine that turning the wheel quickly back and forth would inconsistently put wedge in then out, back and forth steering input would add camber gain then abruptly take it out.

At rough tracks or if your driver nervously saws on the wheel you will definitely create too much of a good thing resulting in a car that never knows quite what to do and stability is lost. Many of the races my cars won were on rough tracks and I commonly ran 2 degrees positive on the right and .5 degrees positive on the left. The idea was to keep the consistency in the car over the bumps and through quick back and forth steering input. I truly believe this to be one of my speeds secrets at rough tracks. Maybe my competition was being aggressive with their front end settings causing their cars to fade later in the race on the worn out surfaces. That is why they throw the green and checkered flag as there is not a right and wrong here but simply a competitive choice.

Your team can analyze your track, car and driver to see if the benefits of added caster and caster split would overcome obstacles that you face. Used properly there is plenty of speed to be found in the correct caster settings. Your job is to understand the changes through chassis roll. Through understanding you can use caster to create speed and your additional planned choices will give you an edge over your competition.