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Replace your bent or broken Trailing Arms with stronger pieces or adjustable arms.

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More About Trailing Arms

Use the J-Bar to help over steer

If you toe in your trailing arms at the front you can use the J-Bar to help over steer the rear end to cure a push in the middle. In this example, mounting the frame side of the J-Bar higher than the pinion side moves the rear end housing to the left as the chassis rolls. As the housing moves left the RR trailing arm gets longer and the RR tire moves back helping the car to turn.

If I have exhausted my reasonable loose in adjustment ideas I might choose to shorten the RR trailing arm an 1/8 to help cure the loose in condition. Often moving the RR ahead cures the loose in condition but you run the risk that the fix is short term. It is possible that you could get a late race center push or the loose in condition could return after the tires heat up and wear a bit. Experience at a given track plays a big role here.

On some days it seems that the push in the center wont go away. Again, I try to avoid messing with the rear end square and go through all of my other ideas before moving away from square. To place this concept in perspective I would say 95% of the races I have ever been around in involved a square rear end. I would say I got a nice handling improvement about half the time that I moved the rear end and saw some or little improvement the other half. Hey, sometimes you miss the set up and it is what it is.

If the car has a push in the center then I might shorten the LR trailing arm 1/8. It would be rare that I would recommend going more than an 1/8 and really I will stick with the thought that square is best 95% of the time maybe even 98%.

You can think out your rear link set up and by understanding how and when the car rolls you can use the trailing arms to help dial in your set up. When using trailing arm angles to help your set up it pays to truly understand the movements at each section of the corner as well as think about any drawbacks that rear steer or under steer might create.

To help the car turn through rear steer you can run the RR trailing arm uphill a ½- 1 at the front. As the car rolls the RR trailing arm will push the rear end housing back on that side. The uphill RR trailing arm adds anti-squat to the car which helps forward bite under acceleration so I like to run some uphill angle in the RR trailing arm. Maybe a ½ up is a starting point.

To really add over steer at the rear end housing you can mount the front pivot point of the RR trailing arm towards the center of the car. With the trailing arms toed in at the front you can use the J-Bar mounting angle to help steer the rear end through roll. If you run the frame side of the J-bar is higher than the pinion side the rear end housing moves left through roll. As the housing moves left the RR trailing arm gets longer and pushes the RR tire back producing rear steer that will help the car turn.

If you want the rear end housing to under steer then mounting the RR trailing arm level and perpendicular to the rear end housing will produce the desired result. As the car rolls the RR Trailing are will shorten pulling the RR tire ahead.

When it comes to trailing arms I try to avoid linkage arrangements that go though center under roll. In other words if the trailing arm starts on an uphill angle I do not want it to go past level and then head downhill. If the travel was enough to create a down hill angle under full roll I would make an adjustment as this can make the care unstable. I want to avoid having the RR tire to move back and avoid having the trailing arm travel through level which would cause the RR to begin moving forward.

Typically, I like run the LR trailing arm up hill about ¾ to 1. There is much debate on this but I like to have a little anti-squat in the car to promote bite under acceleration. If you run a high amount of wedge then level may be a better idea. Since the left side is lifting in the corner the angle increases and the LR trailing arm shortens and keeps moving in the same direction. Again, when it comes to trailing arms I try to avoid linkage arrangements that go though center under roll as going through center can create an unstable car.

Mounting the LR trailing arm with the inner pivots towards the center of the car coupled with the J-Bar running downhill from the pinion to the frame will pull move the LR tire back during roll promoting under steer.

By thinking out the trailing arm angles in conjunction with the J-Bar angle you can guide the rear end housing on the path that helps your set up through the turn. Running the J-Bar higher on the frame side will push the rear end housing to the left through roll. If you run the frame side lower or level the rear end housing will move right through roll. Using the J-Bar mounting angle to in conjunction with trailing arm angles both up and down and left to right gives you another tool in your arsenal helping you to achieve faster lap times.